Hong Kong/China/New York (13/1).   The head of Human Rights Watch Kenneth Roth says he was denied entry to Hong Kong on Sunday, where he was set to launch the NGOs Annual Report. Chinese authorities have warned foreign NGOs not to interfere in Hong Kong affairs hence the rejection of Washington elitist should not come to a surprise, contacts in Beijing report. 

In a Twitter video, Roth, a US citizen, and East coast elitist, said he flew in from New York to hold a press conference to launch the report on Wednesday: “The focus of the report this year was going to be how the Chinese government is really trying to deliberately undermine the international human rights system,” he said.

Many critics of the U.S. NGO argue the Human Rights Watch cherry-picks the agendas. Human Rights violations committed by Islamic States or violence by the Black Shirts or other violence are untouched, a contact in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Beijing said.

Human Rights Watch Kenneth Roth says he was denied entry to Hong Kong on Sunday, where he was set to launch the NGOs Annual Report. “China is a lot more lax to travel than the United States or the EU. If a protester is charged under UK law in Hong Kong with a criminal offense than suddenly it becomes a human rights issue and Germany granting political asylum. It is a rather strange interpretation by these well funded U.S. interest groups.”, she added.  

In a Twitter video, Roth,  a US citizen, said he flew in from New York to hold a press conference to launch the report on Wednesday: “The focus of the report this year was going to be how the Chinese government is really trying to deliberately undermine the international human rights system,” he said.

Though he had entered the city freely before, he said it was the first time he had been denied entry: “Despite my probing, the Hong Kong immigration authorities would say only (and repeatedly) that they were barring me for ‘immigration reasons. They wouldn’t even own up to the real reason.”.

In a response contact in Hong Kong said, “They firestarters of the problem in Hong Kong are well known. They are linked to the U.S. interests despite claims of human rights, democracy and so on. Oddly enough who holds them responsible for the damage, and hate they have created in Hong Kong?”

“What are the  rights of the victims?”, he added, “What the rights of the horrific injuries of the arson victim, or the family of our elder who got killed because he disagreed with the U.S. rioters? Who defends them?”

“If Human Rights means we now have to battle terrorism, IEDs, and attacking police officer, than I say ‘No Thank you’, he added. “Look at the facts. Since “democracy” suddenly appeared our economy is severely damaged, black terror are applied against our transportation system because some nativists are opposing economic development with the mainland, and the foreigners living in Hong Kong claiming we are all communists”, he said.

“Is it not strange that a law that suppose to help prosecution of a murder is rejected by the ‘democracy movement’. Bizarre, right?”. The undercurrent of U.S. interventionism is tearing Hong Kong society apart. Many protesters have found a new purpose, but many are anti-westerner.

The protests are increasingly impacting the ordinary life of Hong Kongers. With the youngsters now in power at the councils the light is on the district councils to deliver what this new ‘democracy’ will deliver. The infrastructure in Hong Kong is crumbling, unemployment is high and university graduates are increasingly seen as suspicious and anti-Hong Kong.

Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said at a daily news briefing in early December 2018 that sanctions will apply to NGOs that “behaved badly” during Hong Kong’s disturbances. She accused the NGOs of having “great responsibility for the chaos in Hong Kong”.

The US-headquartered NGOs include the National Endowment for Democracy, the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs, the International Republican Institute, Human Rights Watch and Freedom House.

“I had hoped to spotlight Beijing’s deepening assault on international efforts to uphold human rights,” Roth said in a statement published later on. “The refusal to let me enter Hong Kong vividly illustrates the problem.”. Kenneth Roth has a long and controversial history even with his own. In Israel, Roth has been criticized for being anti-Israel, a claim Roth vehemently denies.

The Hong Kong event at the Foreign Correspondents’ Club has been cancelled. Roth added that the press conference will take place in New York.

The US-based NGO operates in more than 90 countries. Roth, a former federal prosecutor, involved in the Iran-Contra investigations against the Republican administration of Ronald Reagan, has been the executive director of the human rights watchdog since 1993. Roth is closed to the Democratic party.

‘Sanctions’

Last month, a Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs official threatened “sanctions” against Human Rights Watch and other American pro-democracy organisations.

Sunday’s move comes as protests across the territory enter their seventh month. Originally related to a now-axed extradition bill, demonstrations have escalated into sometimes violent displays of dissent against police behaviour, amid calls for democracy and anger over Beijing’s encroachment.

“My denial of entry pales in comparison to the harassment that Chinese activists routinely endure – jail, torture, and enforced disappearance simply for trying to secure basic rights for their fellow citizens,” Roth said. “But China’s efforts to interfere with the work of international groups like Human Rights Watch is a form of global censorship that governments should resist before it’s too late.”. Hong Kong officials added that it is the right to deny anyone entry to the territory, regardless of what Mr. Roth saying. “Working for Human Rights Watch is not making him above the law”, said a SAR administration official.

A string of other advocates, artists and academics have been denied entry in recent years, including US academic Dan Garrett, UK activist Benedict Rogers and Chinese dissident Feng Congde.